Theology (Study of God)

Theology is basically the study of God and His attributes, but Webster defines it as "The study of religious faith, practice, and experience; especially : the study of God and of God's relation to the world."[1]

The word theology comes from two Greek words, theos (God) and logos (word). From these we can see that theology is the study of God, which includes His attributes. There are also subcategories which have been placed under the umbrella of theology (e.g. Christology, demonology, ecclesiology, eschatology, and others). Christian theology even examines other religious beliefs like cults and religions and compares them to Christianity.

Theology will ever fully explain God and His ways because God is infinitely and eternally higher than we are. Therefore, any attempt to describe Him will fall short (Romans 11:33-36). However, God does want us to know Him as much as we are able, and theology is the art and science of knowing what we can know and understand about God in an organized and understandable manner. Some people try to avoid theology because they believe it is divisive. Properly understood, though, theology is uniting. Proper, biblical theology is a good thing; it is the teaching of God's Word (2 Timothy 3:16-17). All Christians should be consumed with theology, the intense, personal study of God, in order to know, love, and obey the One with whom they will joyfully spend eternity.

FOOTNOTES:

1. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/theology Accessed October 29, 2010.


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